9 Replies Latest reply on Jan 21, 2013 11:10 AM by philmodjunk

    How to get very short tab control buttons

      Title

      How to get very short tab control buttons

      Post


           I am creating something like a hidden tab, and I want to have very short tab buttons, bumps, controls, tabs, whatever you want to call the bits that stick out the top.  I am using FM 12.

           I am using this to simply display some alternate checkbox sets, on a list view, and so want as short of a body part as I can get.  When I make the font size 1pt I still get relatively large tab buttons.  They can go very narrow, but I also want a height decrease.  My checkboxes are only 15pts, and to fit them in this tab group the overall height is 22pts; so about 7pts for tab buttons.  Yes, I would like to save perhaps another 3 or 4 pts in height.  :)

           (The screen shot is at 200% size.)

           Thanks,

           --  J

      Screen_shot_2013-01-16_at_15.19.19.png

        • 1. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons
          philmodjunk

               You can set the width of a tab label to zero, but you cannot change the height. And you can't let the control touch or cross the boundary between header or footter either...

               I can't think of any other approach for this short of creating layouts that are duplicates of each other except for the checkboxes.

          • 2. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons

                 Well that's too bad.  Oh well.  I will see if I can make it look right with these giants.  :)

            • 3. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons
              philmodjunk

                   Hmmm, if your different checkbox sets are all for entering data in the same field, but from different lists of values, a conditional value list might be used and that would eliminate the need for your tab control.

              • 4. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons

                     No, I am essentially recreating a flat table:  user names down the left (the list view) and objects to assign them to across the top.  It is a simple boolean assignment:  yes/no.  

                     There are a lot of objects, though, so I wanted to divide them up into chunks and keep the layout from becoming a huge horizontal mess.  Hence the tabs.  I scripted the tabs at the top (in the header) to switch the tabs in the body list view to correspond to the fields they are being assigned to for that category.  I.e. it shows the checkboxes that correspond to whatever tab in the top is selected.

                     The copy script was all about then taking those boolean assigments and essentially generating a list of emails for a particular list, copy those emails to the clipboard so that the user could then paste them into a web form.

                      

                     --  J

                • 5. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons
                  philmodjunk

                       and objects to assign them to across the top.  It is a simple boolean assignment:  yes/no.

                       And each tab displays a different set of single check box fields?

                       This still feels like something you could do with a single field with a group of checkboxes. A conditional value list used with this field can change the group of boxes displayed on each record and auto-enter calcualtions can then reference the single field to extract specific values from it should that be necessary.

                       The result on your screen can look like this:

                       John [x] apple [ ] kiwi [x] carrot
                       Fred [ ] apricot [x] plum
                       Jim   [ ] prune [x] plum

                       But I can see a drawback to this idea given that the check boxes won't be aligned in neat columns...

                  • 6. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons

                         I believe that you know what I mean, but I am not quite getting what you mean, so I will reiterate my task just in case.  :)

                         Each person has the same options, so I don't think that I need to have a conditional list (unless I am misunderstanding where you envision it being applied).  It is just a giant Excel sheet:  30+ options across the top (possible things to assign them to), and the users down the side.  You go through and check off each person as yes/no to being assigned to that item.  Then there are supporting scripts to generate a list of emails of those people that ARE assigned to an item, and that list gets copied to the user's clipboard.

                         My table has 30+ fields (one for each item to assign them to, plus a few admin and functionality fields), and then 1 record for each user.

                         In order to make the layout more compatc, I broke up the 30 items into categories and put those items on different tabs.  This will probably be an interface that is only used by 1 or 2 admin type folks, it isn't intended for the general users.

                          

                         -- J

                    • 7. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons
                      philmodjunk
                           

                                My table has 30+ fields (one for each item to assign them to

                           Hmmm, I'd take a real careful look at that part of the data were I you. It may be possible to set up a related table for those 30+ fields. I could still get that data organized into columns using one row filtered portals to the related table.

                      • 8. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons

                             Phil,

                                Thanks for the ongoing suggestions.  But I am still missing something; not quite grokking what your suggestions are.  Could you explain them more fully?

                              

                             Thanks,

                             -- J

                        • 9. Re: How to get very short tab control buttons
                          philmodjunk

                               We're a bit "disjointed" here because I still don't have a clear picture of exctly what you are doing. I've tossed out some general suggestions here that may or may not work for you as the devil is in the details.

                               It's basically a good habit to get into any time you find that you have defined a large number of fields (30+) that all have a similar function. That may well be the best design approach, but since there are ways to set up a related table where you have one related record for each field--producing 30+ related records in place of 30+ fields, it's a good idea to consider that option as it may offer advantages not possible/practical with the 30+ individual fields.