6 Replies Latest reply on Apr 20, 2011 4:12 PM by philmodjunk

    Opening a second DB without the user knowing

    martin_kaernten

      Title

      Opening a second DB without the user knowing

      Post

      I have student records on  DBStudents. In a second Database (DBTrainer) the trainer adds his exercises and from a list picks student names from DBStudents. It works; however, when the Trainer opens  DBTrainer he has to log into the DBStudent with name and password. I don't want the Trainer to know that he is using the DBStudent at all. (When we set up both DBs with the same name and PW it works, but if one PW is changed it does not work again) 

      Am I missing the big picture? Or can somebody point me in the right direction....

        • 1. Re: Opening a second DB without the user knowing
          philmodjunk

          I suggest putting the tables for DBTrainer and DBStudents inside a single file. This eliminates the password issues and you don't have any window opening in the background when your trainer accesses the DBStudent file via the DBTrainer database.

          If you choose to continue to use two separate files for this, you can set up a password change layout where the new password is temporarily entered twice into a pair of global fields (Twice to catch typos in the password change). Scripts can then be used to update the passwords in both files so that a password change in one file doesn't create a problem when it tries to open the other file.

          • 2. Re: Opening a second DB without the user knowing
            martin_kaernten

            We want to have the DB separate. So solution 1 is out.

            Is it possible to automaticaly open the second DB in the background as Guest? They should only be able to read the data. 

            Any more advice?

            Thanks from Austria!

            • 3. Re: Opening a second DB without the user knowing
              philmodjunk

              Why keep them separate? In this situation, it's adding a lot of complications you can avoid if you put them in the same file.

              You can Use FileOptions so that the file opens automatically as Guest, but then it opens in guest for everyone unless they hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Mac) while opening the database.

              You could create an "opener file" that opens the second file as guest. Your Script in file 1 Performs a script in the Opener File. The opener file has file options set to open itself with an account name and password that matches to an account name and password defined in file 2 that has read only privileges specified. The last step of the script in the opener file can close the opener file so that it does not remain open.

              And don't forget my other suggestion which is to use a script to manage passwords so that changing a password in one file can be done and the script updates the account and password in the second file to match.

              • 4. Re: Opening a second DB without the user knowing
                rjlevesque

                Yeah why do you want them seperate? Sounds like it should be two tables in one DB to me...

                There are many ways to handle permissions if thatis what is worrying you.

                • 5. Re: Opening a second DB without the user knowing
                  martin_kaernten

                  The setup is like this: The secretary keeps all the student records (some are confidential) The trainer only needs the names to fill in the training. Maybe its possible to add (automaticaly) at intervals just the names to the DBTrainer. The names do not change very often.

                  DOes this seem like a possible workaround?

                  • 6. Re: Opening a second DB without the user knowing
                    philmodjunk

                    Putting the same data in more than one place within your database system isn't a very good idea. Keeping the two tables of information fully synched even when "it doesn change very often" can be a real challenge and imperfectly "synched" data in the two files can really cause problems.

                    You can put all this data in one table and use Manage | Security to control who has access to what records within the tables. Your secretary can access the file with a password that lets the secretary work with the confidential data, but your instructor's passwords can prevent them from seeing the confidential stuff.