5 Replies Latest reply on Feb 27, 2016 5:17 AM by disabled_morkus

    Java, current and future

    PeterWindle

      I would like to know the following:

       

      How dependant is FileMaker on Java (currently) - can I remove it from workstations and or servers?

       

      Cristal ball - will future FileMaker move away from Java? I keep "hearing" things about the future of Java being "un-certain"

        • 1. Re: Java, current and future
          user19752

          Workstations:nothing

          Servers:fully

           

          I don't think FM Server move away from Java, since FMI decided to use it for WebDirect.

          • 2. Re: Java, current and future
            PeterWindle

            aha... thought as much.

             

            On a Mac, it seems like Java is almost a requirement, I'm hoping this won't be the case for long, too many issues.

            • 3. Re: Java, current and future

              Java is the #1 programming language. It runs amazingly fast. I can create a 16M row csv in a few seconds and search, using RegEx, a 500,000 line text file in less than one second! I can't think of a single programming task, other than, say write OS system logic or device drivers (probably better in C), I can't do with Java.

               

              And, the future of Java is not uncertain. Where did you hear that rumor?  As I understood it, (long ago) Steve Jobs hated Java over Apple's own Obj-C. But, now, thanks to Larry at Oracle, Java is now fully installable and supported as a JDK and as JRE. No uncertainty. Java's not going anywhere.

               

              I was very concerned before Oracle bought Sun/Java and really supported the Mac platform. He also owns MySQL, of course, but there's already a fork of that database called MariaDB which is compatible and guaranteed to remain free & open source.

               

              As you can see by the link below, Java is INCREASING in popularity.

               

              TIOBE Index | Tiobe - The Software Quality Company

               

              As much as I LOVE the mac, if Java let the Mac, so would I.

               

              Java Version 8 has many cool features like Lambdas and the ability to process collections declaratively, without imperative code (that is, sort of like using SQL -- specify the "what", but not the "how" code).

               

              I'm primarily a Java dev, so I'm admittedly biased having used it professionally since about 2002.

               

              I'm guessing you're having some other issues.

               

              What issues are you having?

               

              - m

              • 4. Re: Java, current and future
                PeterWindle

                issues are usually at the user level, nothing major.

                 

                I honestly can't recall where I saw something about Java & it's future.

                 

                thanks for the info - just wanting to get a feel for things. I suppose as a Mac user, things where a lot less hassle when Apple took care of the Java environment on Mac OS. Now it's feeling more like Windows...

                 

                • 5. Re: Java, current and future

                  Actually, as I wrote above, it was WHEN Apple was in charge of Java that things were dicey. Apple wasn't beholden to Java and unlike Windows, didn't seem to want to keep the platform agnostic.

                   

                  It seems to me, based on say, resources available (this forum notwithstanding), that FileMaker is a relatively small product in the overall product space. The last time I looked there was (other than FM's own book) one current introductory FileMaker 14 book on the market. Searching for FileMaker jobs on, say, Monster, gave me about four FileMaker jobs then things like "Senior Fashion Copywriter" and "Marketing Professional"  Of course, the job and book availability don't speak to how useful FileMaker is.

                   

                  http://jobs.monster.com/search/?q=filemaker

                   

                  Java, on the other hand, has many, many books and is used almost everywhere - at least in Enterprises and medium-sized companies with developers. Even some of my .NET C# buddies are now learning Java. If you were going to learn to program I would recommend either Python or Java.

                   

                  Good news: Java works extremely well with FileMaker. With SQL, for example, and using a remote data console, I get to avoid the (IMHO) virtually useless Data Viewer's ExecuteSQL endless "?" outputs.

                   

                  Others opt for a SQL plug-in for FileMaker, but I'd rather keep things generic and not get tied to a proprietary platform -- especially considering a typical FM plug-in's cost ($$$) relative to other platforms.

                   

                  I use FIleMaker every day and have zero issues with it- at least bug issues.   FileMaker is definitively part of my critical personal workflow.

                   

                  However, since I now rely on FileMaker for day to day stuff, I'm actually quite worried that FIleMaker might go away or go to a subscription-only model or something else that would make me migrate my FM data and then just delete FM for good. FileMaker, AFIK won't say anything about their future plans, which doesn't help me feel any better from release to release.  I've read similar concerns.

                   

                  Therefore, and this is just me, of course, I keep my distance from FileMaker to just the basic tool. Keep it generic. Since nothing is every mentioned or shared until after the fact, from what I have seen, I have definite uncertainty about what might come next from FM. Take for example the relatively new ($$$) to a concurrent connection-count for FMS. (I was prepared to buy FMS at that point, but stopped cold when I saw the new "pricing model". Now I do everything in free web stuff that's server based.)

                   

                  Thanks for your note and follow up.

                   

                  - m