0 Replies Latest reply on May 19, 2016 5:20 PM by smith7180

    EC2 Specs and Pricing

    smith7180

      I've been doing some research on EC2 instances, and I thought (on account of several posts expressing interest) I'd post some of this info here since it resides on several different page locations at amazon.

       

      InstancevcpuRAM

       

      $/hour

      $/month 1 year com.

      $/month 3 year com.

      ECU

      Network

      Perf.

      Physical

      processr

      t2.nano10.5$0.0088$4.92$3.81varieslow

      "Xeon

      Family"

      t2.micro"1$0.018$8.75$6.50"

      low to

      moderate

      "

      t2.small"2$0.036$19.33$11.94"

      "

      "
      t2.medium24$0.072$37.92$23.86"

      "

      "

      t2.large"8$0.134$65.17$47.72"

      "

      "

      m4.large""$0.246$115.25$89.006.5moderate

      Xeon E5-2676 v3

      m4.xlarge416$0.491$229.58$178.6113high"
      m4.2xlarge832$0.983$549.75$357.3126""
      m4.4xlarge1664$1.966$919.42$714.6153.5""
      m4.10xlarge40160$4.914$2,298.58$1,786.53124.510 Gigabit"

       

      T2 burst specifications:

      nstance

      Baseline

      CPU

      CPU

      Credits/hr

      Max

      Credits

      t2.nano5%372
      t2.micro10%6144
      t2.small20%12288
      t2.medium40%24576
      t2.large60%36864

       

      Monthly prices for reserved instances payed all up front for 1 or 3 year terms.  All prices are for US East.  T2 instances are based on burst performance.  The most thorough description I've found resides here: T2 Instances - Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud :

       

      • One CPU credit is equal to one vCPU running at 100% utilization for one minute. Other combinations of vCPUs, utilization, and time are also equal to one CPU credit; for example, one vCPU running at 50% utilization for two minutes or two vCPUs running at 25% utilization for two minutes.
      • Credits expire after 24 hours
      • If your instance is running low on credits, your instance’s CPU credit consumption (and therefore CPU performance) is gradually lowered to the base performance level over a 15-minute interval, so you will not experience a sharp performance drop-off when your CPU credits are depleted.
      • For example, if a t2.small instance had a CPU utilization of 5% for the hour, it would have used 3 CPU credits (5% of 60 minutes), but it would have earned 12 CPU credits during the hour, so the difference of 9 CPU credits would be added to the CPU credit balance.
      • t2.medium and t2.large instances have two vCPUs. The base performance is an aggregate of the two vCPUs. For example, if you use 100% of a single vCPU and a small amount of the other, your CloudWatch metrics will show over 50% utilization.
      • The accounting process for whether credits are accumulated or spent also happens at a millisecond-level resolution, so you don't have to worry about overspending CPU credits; a short burst of CPU takes a small fraction of a CPU credit.

       

      In other words, you earn credits when running below baseline.  A t2.large with both cpu's at 30% for an hour counts as 60% for the hour.  This consumes 36 credits, thus no credits are earned for the hour.

       

      T2.medium is the first instance that technically meets servers mininum requirement of 2 processors and 4GB.  When I ran my solution on the free tier (t2.micro), it ran really fast (ymmv).  As a total Filemaker Server noob, I'd love to hear the thoughts of the FMS experts on this board.  Hopefully this can help small business vendors can make ends meet.

       

      Message was edited by: J M Broke table in to 2 so it would fit without horizontal scrolling.