5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 12, 2016 3:12 AM by gdurniak

    Crash count?

    Extensitech

      Is there any way to tell how many times a filemaker file has been closed improperly? As an alternative (or addition), is there a way to tell how many times the file has been recovered?

       

      I have a client with a production db that's been up for many years. Until recently, if the file went down (i.e. server crash) they put the file back into production, recovering if necessary. (They simply didn't know that recommended practice was to not return a recovered/damaged file back to production.)

       

      Now, they are considering a fresh rewrite just to create an exact copy of the file, but one that is "pristine", and has never been crashed. Since this process is pretty much just "grunt work", they're considering outsourcing, either offshore or to an inexpensive developer. However, they'd want to be able to verify that a crafty contractor didn't just spoof the creation details of the file and hand their non-pristine file back to them with an invoice.

       

      In my recent experience, the effects of improper shutdowns aren't nearly as devastating as they were in much older versions of FM, but still something to avoid. Outside of this use case, it'd still be of interest to me to be able to evaluate whether a file has been through some crashes and whether such crashes should be considered if problems arise.

       

      TIA

      Chris Cain

      Extensitech

        • 1. Re: Crash count?
          TonyWhite

          The topic of keeping files healthy and figuring out what is wrong is deep and wide. Here are a few thoughts for now.

          You can tell if a file was closed improperly from the FileMaker Server event log if still available. (not likely)

          You can make the recovered count go away by saving as a clone (last I checked), so that is of limited usefulness.

          One could:

          • require deliveries of intermediate versions.
          • Audit the underlying objects, using for example Get ( RecordID ), etc.

          Those 2 tests together would make it harder for a sleazy person to fraudulently misrepresent the work performed.

          http://fmdiff.com/ might help fix the file(s) instead of rebuilding (have had good experience).

          Rebuilding a file with the minimum amount of effort takes skill. If done right, it is part grunt work and part good workflow.

          Hope that helps.

          Tony White
          http://www.twdesigns.com
          http://FileMaker-Fanatics.com

          • 2. Re: Crash count?
            Markus Schneider

            We are using FMDiff/FMVis

             

            FMDiff shows how many times a file was revovered - and how many times it was not closed properly

            • 3. Re: Crash count?
              jkoester
              FMDiff shows how many times a file was revovered - and how many times it was not closed properly

               

              Unfortunately only fp7. The fmp12-DDR no longer contain any information about crashes or recoveries.

               

              ~joerg

              • 5. Re: Crash count?
                gdurniak

                I have collected corruption info here:

                 

                http://www.fileshoppe.com/recover.htm

                 

                A Crashed or Recovered file may be OK. You're just not sure. The key word is "required". Avoid using a file that required recovery. Most of my files have crashed at some point ( and files do not need to crash, to be corrupted )

                 

                Also, corruption is fickle. You could spend thousands to rebuild the file, then find the brand new file is corrupted

                 

                I prefer to let sleeping dogs lie, and not rebuild, unless you have to

                 

                greg

                 

                > it'd still be of interest to me to be able to evaluate whether a file has been through some crashes and whether such crashes should be considered if problems arise