7 Replies Latest reply on May 22, 2012 7:46 AM by wsvp

    How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?

    felipe

      I have a file that shows in the log as damaged and being closed. Now i cant remove the file and upload a back up. Can anyone give me some advice? I have been having a lot of problems ever since i upgraded to 12

       

       

      Update:

      I was able to remove the database by restarting the sever and removing through the sever copy. Does anyone know how a file can become damaged?

        • 1. Re: How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?
          Mike_Mitchell

          Felipe -

           

          In my experience, there are a few things that can cause a file to become damaged while being hosted on Server:

           

          1) Large import operations, especially where the old records are deleted, can cause index corruption that will eventually cause a database to become unusable. (By "large", I mean in the six figures of records being deleted and added back.)

           

          2) Editing the database schema (the Manage Database dialog), especially calculation fields, while users are actively using the database, can corrupt the structure of the database.

           

          3) Overeager server administrators who do not understand FileMaker and restart or (especially) force down the FileMaker Server service without stopping the databases first.

           

          However, in your case, you say you have seen the problem since upgrading to 12. I suspect what you have is long-running corruption that was being ignored by 11 and earlier versions, but being picked up by 12. FileMaker has a history of getting better and better at isolating and detecting low-level corruption with each new release before it becomes so bad that the file is irrecoverable. So, if I were a betting man (which I'm not), I would place my wager on a file that was damaged already, but you just didn't know about it until upgrading to 12.

           

          HTH

           

          Mike

          • 2. Re: How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?
            felipe

            Thanks, This helps out a lot. I did have to rebuild another database right when I upgraded, not this one however, But it looks like i should consider it.

             

            Thanks, again.

            • 3. Re: How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?

              As I know from the many repairs I've done, besides the usual suspects, like

              - power failure

              - inappropriate server shut down

              - hard disk damage, etc.

              there are two main reasons:

              - modifying Accounts and Privileges while other users are logged in

              - making too many modifications in one go without leaving Define Database mode.

               

              Using older versions (FM 8.5 or 9) add to the risk.

               

              Winfried

               

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              • 4. Re: How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?
                BruceRobertson

                In addition to other suggestions, have users ever opened the file by using OS level file sharing instead of using "open remote"?

                • 6. Re: How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?
                  coherentkris

                  Add virus scanning or backing up (not FMS backup) live files

                  • 7. Re: How does a file get damaged on the Server copy?
                    wsvp

                    I second the Virus Scanning...  Active virus scanning can also devastate performance as well. Another thing to watch is Auto-Updates, these can cause FM and FM-server to crash.  Additionally I have seen many cases where the end users pay no attention to the space available on the hard drive.  Exceeding 90% of drive capacity can result in System and data corruption.