5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 6, 2012 4:13 PM by Mike_Mitchell

    Strange question - "how much bandwidth?"

    Mike_Mitchell

      Good day. I've just deployed a solution using a hosting service, intended for my wife's company. They're spread across 2 or 3 offices, and in one of the offices, it's apparent that port 5003 is not open on the external firewall. When inquiring with the network admins, they've asked (and I quote):

       

      "Do you know what kind of bandwidth this is going to use/need?"

       

      Well, I'm at a loss. Is there an easy way to answer this question, other than asking the hosting company to use the admin console to give me a low, average, and peak KB/sec value per user?

       

      Mike

        • 1. Re: Strange question - "how much bandwidth?"
          BobGossom

          Mike,

           

          FMPS is set up to take as much bandwidth as is needs. This allows it to scale up on faster networks. For data entry, it might not need too much, but call up a list view and the server will start pumping data. If images are involved, it will take even more.

           

          I'd suggest opening the port with no restrictions and monitor it. If it turns out FMPS is compromising other processes, then restrict it. Alternatively, you could request that they throttle FMPS to about 1/2 of the available bandwidth and see how that works out for everyone.

           

          We have a client with an extremely slow DSL connection (.6mb/s up and .05 down , barely faster than dialup). Remote FMP access for data entry is pretty acceptable, while complex reports just die. Depending on their usage, it's possible you could throttle FMP and still have happy campers.

           

          Interestingly enough, I've never had a network where users complained about FMPS hogging bandwidth - it's always the other way around. Usually users are streaming media, or copying huge files, and the FMP users complain. So you might end up in a position where they will need to throttle other processes to guarantee enough for FMPS.

           

          When it comes to speed issues, you can theorize about it forever. There are so many variables that real world testing is will often hold surprises, good and bad.

           

          Bob Gossom

          • 2. Re: Strange question - "how much bandwidth?"
            Mike_Mitchell

            Thanks, Bob.

             

            Now tell the network admins that.   

             

            Seriously, they don't seem to want to open the port unless I can give them some "expected" or "typical" numbers. (They seem to be afraid that adding new load to their network will compromise its performance.) I know there's not a real way to predict this. So do you. But what do you suggest I tell these people?

             

            Mike

            • 3. Re: Strange question - "how much bandwidth?"
              sporobolus

              on 2012-08-06 15:09 Mike_Mitchell wrote

              Seriously, they don't seem to want to open the port unless I can give them some "expected" or "typical" numbers. (They seem to be afraid that adding new load to their network will compromise its performance.) I know there's not a real way to predict this. So do you. But what do you suggest I tell these people?

               

              tell them that if it went through port 80 they'd have no control at all, but

              that as things are, they can open the port and monitor it so they have all the

              control they need

              • 4. Re: Strange question - "how much bandwidth?"
                ch0c0halic

                Mike may have an uptight sysadmin,

                 

                Comparing several of our servers I think you can be safe with these numbers.

                IN - Avg. 1 KB/sec with one at Avg. 7 KB/Sec.

                and

                OUT - most were at Avg. 1 KB/Sec with one at Avg. 22 KB/Sec.

                 

                Caveats:

                If you only do minimal new records your IN time may be <1KB/Sec.

                If you are doing a lot of new record creating with a lot of users your IN may be closer to. 2-3 KB/Sec.

                If you have image files being imported (IN BW) or exported or displayed on layouts (OUT BW) your I/O times will be greater.

                Streaming media will increase the Avg. and Peak.

                 

                For most DB an Avg. of around 1KB/Sec up and down speeds will be sufficient. If your user's complain then double it. If they still complain double it again. I doubt these numbers are going to be of long term interest to the Sysop once s/he sees how low they are.

                • 5. Re: Strange question - "how much bandwidth?"
                  Mike_Mitchell

                  Thanks, Jimmy. I know we have several FM11 systems at work, and I could use those servers, but with an FM12 server ... I just wasn't sure what numbers to use. Big help. I know these are just "rule of thumb" figures, and I'll make that clear.

                   

                  Mike

                   

                  (And yes ... these folks are a bit uptight. Probably because they have some folks in the building who are a little too addicted to streaming video ...)