2 Replies Latest reply on Oct 21, 2013 7:08 PM by flybynight

    Any guides to helping a MS Access user switch to FileMaker Pro?

    wlegard

      I'm a long time Microsoft Access user trying to convert my databases over to FileMaker 12 Pro Advanced. Does anybody know of any written guides (pdf, ebook, written book) that discuss from an Access user's perspective how to develop a database in FileMaker Pro?

       

      I know what I want to do, but I often don't even know the proper FileMaker Pro terminology to intelligently ask the correct questions.

       

      Thanks in advance,

      Wilde

        • 1. Re: Any guides to helping a MS Access user switch to FileMaker Pro?
          Mike_Mitchell

          Wilde -

           

          I don't know of any printed materials specifically. However, here's a quick translator:

           

          1) In Access you have forms and reports. In FileMaker, you have layouts.

          2) In Access, you have queries. No such animal in FileMaker; you operate from a Relationships Graph that operates like a hybrid between an ERD and a query engine. You also have the Find operation, which is client-specific.

          3) Speaking of Find, in Access, you would typically assemble a query for everything. In FileMaker, this is most often done with a Find Request (although you can use the new ExecuteSQL function to perform a SQL query).

           

          Hope that helps. If you have a specific question, I'm sure someone will be willing to chime in and give you an answer.

           

          Mike

          • 2. Re: Any guides to helping a MS Access user switch to FileMaker Pro?
            flybynight

            Most of the FMP training materials will discuss, if not exactly from an Access point of view, at least from generic database terms. I would just recommend taking in as much as you can. The FileMaker Training Series (FTS) is a great resource. The stuff on Lynda.com is great too. If you are familiar with database basics, you should be fine. You will run into some things that drive you nuts because you are so used to doing a task a certain way, and FMP will seem like many more steps. But when you really start to learn it, you will see the power of the full solutions you can easily build with FMP.

             

            Good luck and welcome to the community!

            -Shawn