2 Replies Latest reply on Jan 22, 2014 8:26 AM by mark_scott

    Slide controls: different types of behavior

    JavierDura

      Using FileMaker Pro, you can click any of the navigation dots to go directly to a particular panel.

      But, under FileMaker Go, clicking the dot moves you from one panel to another (one by one) so you cannot navigate directly to the panel you want.

       

      Maybe this different type of behavior could be a little bit confusing, isn't it?

        • 1. Re: Slide controls: different types of behavior
          Stephen Huston

          There are still a lot of inconsistencies between default behaviors in Pro and Go.

           

          There is an option to hide the little dots in the panel settings, and one can then program one's own buttons on the panels to manage navigation in other ways than those defaults.

          • 2. Re: Slide controls: different types of behavior
            mark_scott

            Hola Javier,

             

            Good catch!  One thing I'll add (just as an observation) is that at least the FM Go dot behavior is consistent with general iOS behavior.  If, on your iPad home screen, you tap anywhere in the dot area, to the left or right of the active dot, the view only advances in that direction by one page no matter which dot you tapped, just as in FM Go.

             

            On the desktop, I'm tending toward Stephen's approach, partly because the dots are a rather small click target (and swipe-based navigation is not available) and partly because I'm seeing the slide-panel control as being much more than just a slide panel.  It's one part "tabless" tab panel and one part conditional visibility on steroids.  "Hide object when" is fantastic for hiding one or a couple objects, but when the goal is to hide a bunch of objects and show another bunch in their place, depending on certain conditions, a dotless slide panel coupled with a script trigger or two is an amazing approach.

             

            Best,

             

            Mark