4 Replies Latest reply on May 9, 2014 5:41 PM by raycon

    Single Login

    raycon

      Hello All,

       

      I have read all I can find about security but can't find an answer to this one.

       

      I have a solution where an iOS app accesses a file hosted by FMS.

      The iOS app is a skeleton file, layouts and scripts, and all data is on the host, so that I don't have synching to worry about.

      The access accounts are handled by the hosted file and the iOS app is set to auto login using a Read-Only privilege set.

       

      So here's my problem.

       

      My users are lazy. If they hit cancel on the login screen (they don't know they're only cancelling the host login) the iOS up still fires up but without file access to the host. Complaints pour in.

      If the iOS device is interrupted (say by a phone call) the user is sometimes presented with a re-login screen for the iOS app. They don't look at the filename being accessed (and don't want to know) and are annoyed when their login (for the host file) is rejected.

       

      How do I get around this? Is there a way to "Get" the current set of accounts from the host file and use them to log in to the iOS app, then pass the same authentication back to the hosted file?

       

      I guess what I want is single login without using Active Directory?

       

      Can anyone advise me?

       

      (Apologies for the poor description)

        • 1. Re: Single Login
          DavidJondreau

          You've got a couple options...

           

          1) On your host file set up a privilege set and account that has only permission to run a single "Re-Login" script. The file should be set to open to that account by default. On opening your iOS file, run a script that displays a custom dialog to capture the username and password the user wants to use in the host file. From that script call the "Re-login" script in the host file passing the username and password as a parameter.

           

          2) You could also allow users to "authorize" their devices. One downside would be all authorized devices would be using a single account. But as long as a user's iPad has been verified, they won't have to log in again (or only after a day or week). You'd need a table to hold the Persistent ID of a device, and some scripts for the login, authorization, and de-authorization of devices, but users love it.

           

           

          Also, make sure your iOS opening script closes itself after opening the host file and then you shouldn't be asked to log in to the iOS file again after it opens the host.

          • 2. Re: Single Login
            raycon

            Thank you David, that sounds like a great solution to my problem.  I'll give option 1 a go this morning.

            Have you used this method yourself?

             

            Sounds like you've used option 2 before, but it is more complex and will take me more time to set up, so....

             

            Cheers

             

            Ray

            • 3. Re: Single Login
              raycon

              Hi David,

               

              I'm not sure what the protocol is, but I don't wish to be rude.

               

              I've not responded further only because I've not yet had a chance to try it out.

               

              Ray

              • 4. Re: Single Login
                raycon

                Thankyou David, option 1 has worked out very well!!

                 

                 

                Thanks again

                 

                Ray