3 Replies Latest reply on Apr 12, 2012 8:22 AM by philmodjunk

    Capability to replace data and assign values to data elements

    DonnaWilliams

      Title

      Capability to replace data and assign values to data elements

      Post

      I am currently using Excel pivot tables to manage data. However, I would need to create macros to accomplish certain data replacement requirements.  Specifically, I get data from my ordering backend which needs to be manipulated.  For example, lets say my database gives me 5 different product types ordered.  Two of them are exactly the same product but called different names :  "Large Bag Subscription" and "Single Large Bag".  For production and delivery purposes I just need to know I have X number of LARGE BAGs.  with Excel I need to cut and paste replace the names in order to get one number.  I Have a list of delivery locations associated with the products.  For example, 5 Large Bags  delivered to ABC Street and 2 Small Bags to 123 Street.  I need list I can use for making labels that print in order of delivery.  All individual orders for ABC Street, whichis stop #1, are listed first and then 123 Street order are Stop #2.  The problem is each week I have to manually assign a numbe to each location for each order.  

       

      Finally the question:  Can Filemaker Pro solve these problems for me better than hiring someone to write macros for Excel?

        • 1. Re: Capability to replace data and assign values to data elements
          philmodjunk

          Your post raises many unanswered questions about your business practices and how you get more than one product description entered for the same product.

          Yes, FileMaker can update a single field for a set of records very easily. This is called Replace Field Contents. You can perform a find for all products of a specific product ID, Edit the description field and then use Replace Field Contents to update all the other records just found to match.

          You can also set up a table of products that drives a value list so that you only get one product description appearing in your database in the first place.

          With regards to labels, you can set up a table of locations and can use a value list formatted field to assign each address to a related location record. Then, when you select an existing address, it is automatically linked to that delivery stop. Sorting and printing labels can then be done quite easily with your address records sorted and thus grouped by delivery stop in an order you have specified only once when you first set up your table of location records.

          • 2. Re: Capability to replace data and assign values to data elements
            DonnaWilliams

            Thank you.  Sounds like Filemaker PRo is my solution.  Good point about business practices.  I use a third party shopping cart.  The name that is in the backend is the one that shows on the website.  The products are different in that one is purchased as a weekly subscription and the other can be purchased one at a time. The price is a bit higher for the onetime purchase.  I give them different names for the customers.  But upon reflection I don't really need to.

             

            Another question: Is it reasonable to say the filemaker does all the same basic functions as excel.

             

             

            • 3. Re: Capability to replace data and assign values to data elements
              philmodjunk

              Given the difference in price charged, some distinction in your system to reflect that would be a good idea, but you can have one field that identifies the item and a separate item that identifies the pricing option selected.

              Another question: Is it reasonable to say the filemaker does all the same basic functions as excel.

              The mind set behind your question can get you into trouble. Excel does "spread sheet tasks" well. Filemaker does "relational database tasks" well. There is signficant overlap between the two, but they are very different applications with a different basic focus and result in very different user interfaces.

              If you try to use FileMaker to recreate exactly what you see on the screen in Excel, you are very likely to get frustrated with FileMaker. If you learn how FileMaker and relational databases work and design layouts that exploit the strengths of FileMaker and relational database design, you are likely to be much happier with the end result even though your screens won't look exactly like your original spreadsheets.

              Best/cheapest way to evaluate FileMaker for your use is to download the 30 day free trial and see if you can get it to work for you.